A_Living_Alternative

20 Great Reasons Why You’ll Want to Read A Living Alternative

I was disappointed that my copy of A Living Alternative arrived too late for the MennoNerds January blog tour. But when it finally arrived, my disappointment quickly turned into deep engagement. The book's wide range drew me in, from Old Testament scholarship to church planting to the experience of being single; from heavily researched pieces … Continue reading 20 Great Reasons Why You’ll Want to Read A Living Alternative

Love Letters from Prison and the Ultimate Act of Faith

I like to think of Jerome Segers and Lijsken Dircks as the Romeo and Juliet of Anabaptist history. Like Shakespeare’s young lovers, Jerome and Lijsken loved one another deeply, became separated against their will, and tragically died apart. But unlike the fictional Romeo and Juliet, Jerome and Lijsken lived real flesh and blood lives, and … Continue reading Love Letters from Prison and the Ultimate Act of Faith

Health_Healing_Church_Mission

Health, Healing and the Church’s Mission

I first met Willard Swartley when he was a professor at what is now Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary, and have learned a great deal from his careful scholarship, kindness, and partnership with his wife, Mary. When Anabaptist Witness invited me to review Willard's new book, I was eager to do so since I already knew … Continue reading Health, Healing and the Church’s Mission

I once was a pilgrim, but now I’m planted

Please note that any links to the Jesus event have been removed as that blog is no longer in service. Instead, you can read my interview re-edited and with a new title here: On a Pilgrimage, Following Jesus.   Today I'm delighted to make an appearance on the Jesus event, a blog by fellow MennoNerd … Continue reading I once was a pilgrim, but now I’m planted

Toward Racial Reconciliation: Reflection & Practice

Last week I took part in my first-ever Google Hangout -- #MennoNerds on Race, Mutuality, and Anabaptist Community. In this post I share the video of our conversation, offer some further reflections, and outline some practices toward racial reconciliation.

I am an Anabaptist, too

I'm part of several different online communities and learning a lot from each one - in areas that we have in common and in areas that challenge me. In another 10 days, I plan to take part in #MennoNerds on Race, Mutuality, and Anabaptist Community. You're invited to join us live, or watch it later.

Are Spiritual Practices Too “Catholic” to be “Anabaptist”?

I should know better than to read reviews of my own books, but I was quite surprised that a reader described my Sacred Pauses as "a new kind of consumer-friendly Jesuit spirituality." Really?? What is an Anabaptist spirituality? And why not allow ourselves to be enriched by other traditions?