The Perfect Small Group Leaders’ Guide

Well, ok, so I already know from the raging perfectionist that nothing is perfect.

by nirots, freedigitalphotos.net

by nirots, freedigitalphotos.net

But if there were such a thing as the perfect small group leaders’ guide, what would it look like?

  • A booklet just for leaders?
  • A one-page handout for each session for each participant?
  • A Video to watch together?
  • Reading and studying Scripture?
  • Group discussion questions?
  • Time for personal sharing?
  • Practical application time as part of the group gathering?
  • Suggestions for “homework” in between sessions?
  • All of the above?
  • A flexible format so the leader can choose the emphasis?
  • ???

This Thursday evening, I’ll be meeting with a small group from my church to help me develop a Sacred Pauses small group guide–not so much a study of the book, but a guide to developing spiritual practices. It won’t be perfect of course, but I’m praying it will be a good process for us as a group and produce a useful resource for others.

Thank you to the two men and seven women who signed up, including:

  • a mom who has young children at home
  • two with school-aged children
  • a former nurse
  • two teachers
  • a musician
  • a businessperson
  • some married, some not
  • some part of existing small groups in my church, some not
  • diverse in age, occupation, and ethnic background

I’m excited for this small group! And yet for all our diversity, I realize that we’re all connected with one church in one little corner of the world, so I’m looking to those of you reading this blog to please help us enlarge our vision. If you have any feedback to share about what you look for in a small group guide–or some definite things to avoid–please leave a comment below. I’d really appreciate your help!



Categories: Church and Ministry, Sacred Pauses, Writing

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6 replies

  1. How about a request to get a hold of a copy once you’re done? This sounds like a FABULOUS little tool for church communities.

  2. Why not help one another with the grimy emergencies in everyday life- as Jesus did- and then over coffee talk about our individual spiritual journeys? But to start this, we need to allow others (in the church) to share our space. The greatest impediment to spiritual community development in the developed Western World is our immediate biological family and our wealth. Most of us would sooner play with our grandchildren than spend time with a co-congregation fellow.

    • Walter, you raise an important issue–how we choose to spend our time is critical, and that also applies to time spent getting to know our neighbours/reaching out to others beyond the church. I may need to quote you on this.

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